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30 presentation feedback examples

April 5, 2022 - 16 min read

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You're doing great

You should think of improving

Tips to improve

3 things to look for when providing presentation feedback

3 tips for giving effective feedback

We’re all learning as we go. 

And that’s perfectly OK — that’s part of being human. On my own personal growth journey, I know I need to get better at public speaking and presenting. It’s one of those things that doesn’t necessarily come naturally to me. 

And I know there are plenty of people in my shoes. So when it comes to presenting in the workplace, it can be intimidating. But there’s one thing that can help people continue to get better at presentations: feedback

The following examples not only relate to presentations. They can also be helpful for public speaking and captivating your audience. 

You’re doing great 

  • You really have the natural ability to hand out presentation material in a very organized way! Good job!
  • Your presentations are often compelling and visually stunning. You really know how to effectively captivate the audience. Well done!
  • You often allow your colleagues to make presentations on your behalf. This is a great learning opportunity for them and they often thrive at the challenge.
  • Keeping presentations focused on key agenda items can be tough, but you’re really good at it. You effectively outline exactly what it is that you will be discussing and you make sure you keep to it. Well done!!
  • You created downloadable visual presentations and bound them for the client. Excellent way to portray the company! Well done!
  • Your content was relevant and your format was visually appealing and easy to follow and understand. Great job! You’re a real designer at heart!
  • You always remain consistent with the way you present and often your presentations have the same style and layout. This is great for continuity. Well done!
  • You always remain consistent with every presentation, whether it be one on ones, small group chats, with peers, direct reports, and the company bosses. You have no problem presenting in any one of these situations. Well done!
  • You are an effective presenter both to employees and to potential clients. When controversial topics come up, you deal with them in a timely manner and you make sure these topics are fully dealt with before moving on. Well done!
  • You effectively command attention and you have no problem managing groups during the presentation.

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You should think of improving 

  • You’re a great presenter in certain situations, but you struggle to present in others. Try to be more consistent when presenting so that you get one single-minded message across. This will also help you broaden your presentation skills by being able to portray one single idea or message.
  • You tend to be a little shy when making presentations. You have the self-confidence in one-on-one conversations, so you definitely have the ability to make compelling presentations. Come on! You can do it!
  • During presentations, there seems to be quite a lack of focus. I know it can be difficult to stick to the subject matter, however you need to in order for people to understand what the presentation is about and what is trying to be achieved.
  • To engage with your audience and make them attentively listen to what you have to say, you need to be able to use your voice in an effective manner to achieve this. Try to focus on certain words that require extra attention and emphasis these words during your presentation.
  • Knowing your audience is critical to the success of any presentation. Learn to pick up on their body language and social cues to gauge your style and tone. Listen to what your audience has to say and adjust your presentation accordingly.

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  • During presentations, it’s expected that there will be tough questions. Try to prepare at least a couple of days before the time so that you can handle these questions in an effective manner.
  • To be an effective presenter you need to be able to adjust to varying audiences and circumstances. Try learning about who will be in the room at the time of the presentation and adjust accordingly.
  • Remember not to take debate as a personal attack. You tend to lose your cool a little too often, which hinders the discussion and people feel alienated. You can disagree without conflict.
  • The only way you are going to get better at public speaking is by practicing, practicing, practicing. Learn your speech by heart, practice in the mirror, practice in front of the mirror. Eventually, you’ll become a natural and you won't be afraid of public speaking any longer.
  • Your presentations are beautiful and I have no doubt you have strong presentation software skills. However, your content tends to be a bit weak and often you lack the substance. Without important content, the presentation is empty.

Tips to improve 

  • Remember it’s always good to present about the things you are passionate about. When you speak to people about your passions they can sense it. The same goes for presentations. Identify what it is that excites you and somehow bring it into every presentation. it’ll make it easier to present and your audience will feel the energy you portray.
  • Sometimes it can be easier to plan with the end result in mind. Try visualizing what it is you are exactly expecting your audience to come away with and develop your presentation around that.
  • Simplicity is a beautiful thing. Try to keep your presentations as simple as possible. Make it visually appealing with the least amount of words possible. Try interactive pictures and videos to fully immerse your audience in the presentation.
  • It’s a fine balance between winging the presentation and memorizing the presentation. If you wing it too much it may come across as if you didn't prepare. If you memorize it, the presentation may come off a bit robotic. Try to find the sweet spot, if you can.
  • When presenting, try to present in a way that is cause for curiosity. Make people interested in what you have to say to really captivate them. Have a look at some TED talks to get some tips on how you can go about doing this.
  • Remember presentations should be about quality, not quantity. Presentations that are text-heavy and go on for longer than they should bore your audience and people are less likely to remember them.
  • Try to arrive at every staff meeting on time and always be well prepared. This will ensure that meetings will go smoothly in the future.
  • Remember to respect other people's time by always arriving on time or five minutes before the presentation.
  • Remember to ask the others in the meeting for their point of view if there are individuals during presentations.
  • If you notice presentations are deviating off-topic, try to steer it back to the important topic being discussed.

3 things to look for when providing presentation feedback

Presentation feedback can be intimidating. It’s likely the presenter has spent a good deal of time and energy on creating the presentation.

As an audience member, you can hone in on a few aspects of the presentation to help frame your feedback. If it's an oral presentation, you should consider also audience attention and visual aids.

It’s important to keep in mind three key aspects of the presentation when giving feedback. 

presentation-feedback-examples-presenting-team-meeting

Communication

  • Were the key messages clear? 
  • Was the speaker clear and concise in their language?
  • Did the presenter clearly communicate the key objectives? 
  • Did the presenter give the audience clear takeaways? 
  • How well did the presenter’s voice carry in the presentation space? 

Delivery 

  • Was the presentation engaging? 
  • How well did the presenter capture their audience? 
  • Did the presenter engage employees in fun or innovative ways? 
  • How interactive was the presentation? 
  • How approachable did the presenter appear? 
  • Was the presentation accessible to all? 

Body language and presence 

  • How did the presenter carry themselves? 
  • Did the presenter make eye contact with the audience? 
  • How confident did the presenter appear based on nonverbal communication? 
  • Were there any nonverbal distractions to the presentation? (i.e. too many hand gestures, facial expressions, etc.)  

3 tips for giving effective feedback

There are plenty of benefits of feedback. But giving effective feedback isn’t an easy task. Here are some tips for giving effective feedback. 

1. Prepare what you’d like to say 

I’m willing to bet we’ve all felt like we’ve put our foot in our mouth at one point or another. Knee-jerk, emotional reactions are rarely helpful. In fact, they can do quite the opposite of help. 

Make sure you prepare thoughtfully. Think through what feedback would be most impactful and helpful for the recipient. How will you word certain phrases? What’s most important to communicate? What feedback isn’t helpful to the recipient? 

You can always do practice runs with your coach. Your coach will serve as a guide and consultant. You can practice how you’ll give feedback and get feedback … on your feedback. Sounds like a big loop, but it can be immensely helpful. 

2. Be direct and clear (but lead with empathy) 

Have you ever received feedback from someone where you’re not quite sure what they’re trying to say? Me, too. 

I’ve been in roundabout conversations where I walk away even more confused than I was before. This is where clear, direct, and concise communication comes into play. 

Be clear and direct in your message. But still, lead with empathy and kindness. Feedback doesn’t need to be harsh or cruel. If it’s coming from a place of care, the recipient should feel that care from you. 

3. Create dialogue (and listen carefully) 

Feedback is never a one-way street. Without the opportunity for dialogue, you’re already shutting down and not listening to the other person.

Make sure you’re creating space for dialogue and active listening. Invite questions — or, even better, feedback. You should make the person feel safe, secure, and trusted. You should also make sure the person feels heard and valued. 

Your point of view is just that: it's one perspective. Invite team members to share their perspectives, including positive feedback

You might also offer the recipient the opportunity for self-evaluation. By doing a self-evaluation, you can reflect on things like communication skills and confidence. They might come to some of the same important points you did — all on their own.

Now, let’s go practice that feedback 

We're all learners in life.

It's OK to not be perfect. In fact, we shouldn't be. We're perfectly imperfect human beings, constantly learning, evolving, and bettering ourselves. 

The same goes for tough things like presentations. You might be working on perfecting your students' presentation. Or you might want to get better at capturing your audience's attention. No matter what, feedback is critical to that learning journey

Even a good presentation has the opportunity for improvement. Don't forget the role a coach can play in your feedback journey.

Your coach will be able to provide a unique point of view to help you better communicate key points. Your coach can also help with things like performance reviews, presentation evaluations, and even how to communicate with others.

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Published April 5, 2022

Madeline Miles

Madeline is a writer, communicator, and storyteller who is passionate about using words to help drive positive change. She holds a bachelor's in English Creative Writing and Communication Studies and lives in Denver, Colorado. In her spare time, she's usually somewhere outside (preferably in the mountains) — and enjoys poetry and fiction.

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